Sunday, December 18, 2005


One lonely mushroom, a small bracket fungus growning in the wetlands at East Peoria.
J G Ward

Walking on the ice covering part of the beaver pond.
J G Ward

Mallard wings spread wide!
J G Ward

A crunchy walk down the boardwalk to the beaver pond. There was no sneaking up on the Mallards this afternoon!
J G Ward

Mallard ducks feeding, sun peeking from clouds provides a subtle light.
J G Ward

Murray Baker Bridge on a cold afternoon in December.
J G Ward

Peoria Skyline and Bridge.
J G Ward

East Peoria Festival of Lights Laser Dome. You pay 10.00 to see a laser show inside the dome. I decided to watch from outside in the cold. Brrrrrrr!
J G Ward

Murray Baker Bridge at night.
J G Ward

Wednesday, December 14, 2005


Pumpkins in the snow.
J G Ward

Railroad bridges crossing Kickapoo Creek near the Illinois River.
J G Ward

Ice on the beaver pond.
J G Ward

View of Peoria from the wetlands across the river.
J G Ward

Walking in the sun,
J G Ward

and talking to me.
J G Ward

Rising up . . .
J G Ward

showing her blue wing feathers!
J G Ward

A closer look at the female Mallard swimming on the beaver pond at Cooper's Park, East Peoria, IL.
J G Ward

Mallard duck swimming. The other ducks flew away as Scott and I approached. This female stayed and posed for a few photos.
J G Ward

View from Sanitation Road, Bartonville, IL, near where Kickapoo Creek enters the Illinois River. Thre is no access to the mouth of the creek, due to the sanitation works.
J G Ward

White-breasted Nuthatch, from the back. He moved around so fast, this was the best I could do.
J G Ward

Monday, December 05, 2005


Mallard Duck on display at the wetlands. This small area has been preserved by the park district in East Peoria. It is fed by a natural spring and has open water even in sub-freezing weather. There were several dozen mallards feeding in the beaver pond. I took this photo from the boardwalk that runs through the wetland.
J G Ward

Song Sparrow at the wetlands across the river at East Peoria's Cooper's Park.
J G Ward

Butterball & Napster, napping.
J G Ward

Sunday, November 27, 2005

World Bird Sanctuary



The World Bird Sanctuary opened the Raptor Hospital in 2003 to treat ill and injured raptors. Raptors, or birds of prey, include eagles, hawks, owls, vultures, falcons, kites, condors and osprey. The biggest threat to these majestic creatures is collision with man-made objects such as wires, buildings, vehicles and fences.

The sanctuary receives over 300 raptors that have been injured in the wild each year. A trained rehabilitation team works closely with volunteer veterinarians to rehabilitate these birds and release them back to the wild to live out their natural lives. The ones who can't make it in the wild live here.
J G Ward

Lizzard Buzzard


Skyler, a Lizzard Buzzard.
J G Ward

Great Horned Owl


Jake, the Great Horned Owl.
J G Ward

Long-crested Eagle


Chrys, the Long Crested Eagle.
J G Ward

Spectacled Owl at the World Bird Sanctuary


Latee, a Spectacled Owl.
J G Ward

K-ee-oo


K-ee-oo, talking and flapping his wings. Photograph by Mary Elizabeth.
J G Ward

Augur Buzzard


K-ee-oo, the Augur Buzzard.
J G Ward

Tawny Eagle


Max, a Tawny Eagle. Photograph by Mary Elizabeth. He was barking, like a dog, to get the attention of the staff member who was answering questions about the birds.
J G Ward

Red-shouldered Hawk


Meramec, the Red-shouldered Hawk.
J G Ward

Thick-Billed Parrot


Thick-Billed Parrot on display.
J G Ward

Scarlet Macaw


Scarlet Macaw eating peanuts at the World Bird Sanctuary.
J G Ward

Green Tree Python


Green Tree Python(Morelia viridis. Photograph by Mary Elizabeth.
Anna, the Green Tree Python is found in the tropical rainforests of New Guinea and northern Australia. Young snakes are brilliantly colored golden-yellow or brick-red, colors found in native arboreal flowers. When resting, it loops itself saddle-fashion over a branch, anchoring itself with its prehensile tail and cradling its head in the middle of its comfortably draped coils, as seen in this photograph.
J G Ward

Bald Eagles


Bald Eagles, photographed by Mary Elizabeth. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), our national bird, is the only eagle unique to North America. The bald eagle's scientific name signifies a sea (halo) eagle (aeetos) with a white (leukos) head. Bald eagles are found over most of North America, from Alaska and Canada to northern Mexico.
J G Ward

Turkey Vulture


Turkey Vulture, photographed by Mary Elizabeth.
The Turkey Vulture is one of North America's largest birds of prey. It reaches a length of 32 inches with a wing span of 6 feet. Its overall color is brown-black with a featherless, red head, white bill and yellow feet among mature adults. Immature birds have a darker face. Although usually silent, the bird will occasionally emit a soft hiss or groan. In flight, the Turkey Vulture rocks from side to side, rarely flapping its wings which are held at a V-angle called a dihedral. Silver-gray flight feathers look lighter than the black lining feathers of the underwing. Its long tail extends beyond its legs and feet in flight.
J G Ward

Monday, November 21, 2005

Storm in the Distance


Storm in the distance. While driving home from Bloomington, I could see it raining over a farm in the distance. Lightening began later, but I didn't make any more stops.
J G Ward

Swan Love


Swan and Cygnet.
J G Ward

Swans on a Log


Swans sunning on a log, Banner Marsh.
J G Ward

Mallard Ducks


Mallard Ducks at Cooper's Park Wetlands.
J G Ward

Velvet Stem Mushrooms


Winter mushrooms at Cooper's Park Wetlands in East Peoria. They looked like a great bunch, but we couldn't get to them from the boardwalk.
J G Ward

Thursday, November 10, 2005